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COMPLEX POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER THERAPY IN CHARLESTON, SC.

While it hasn’t made its way into the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Health Disorders (DSM), Complex Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (C-PTSD) has been researched since the 1990s. This form of trauma can differ from acute trauma in its effects and can persist for years if left untreated.

TREATING ADULTS WITH C-PTSD.

ORIGINS OF C-PTSD

Complex PTSD may develop when individuals are exposed to long-term physical, sexual, emotional, or relational trauma, particularly during a formative or impressionable period of life. This trauma can take the form of bullying, neglect, severe invalidation, a lack of supportive attunement, and unpredictability/unsafety from caretakers.

Image by Simon Berger

C-PTSD SYMPTOMS MAY INCLUDE

  • Identity issues

  • Dissociation or zoning out

  • Difficulty managing distress

  • Challenges with self-esteem

  • Persistent anxiety or depression

  • Emotional flashbacks or flooding

  • Isolation and difficulty trusting others

GETTING BETTER FROM COMPLEX TRAUMA.

  • Working with C-PTSD involves a scaffolded approach, beginning with psychoeducation. If you’re unfamiliar with this condition or have questions, we’ll have the chance to define some terms and get familiar with how C-PTSD shows up in your life.

  • Exposure therapy can in part be accomplished through courageous conversation. When you’re ready, you’ll have the space to process your trauma narrative with the goal of reducing your subjective distress and the emotional intensity of C-PTSD memories and episodes.

  • Depending on the severity and duration, trauma affects our nervous systems. Simply put, our brains create an imprint of people/places/events, forming the origin for “triggers”. Healing from trauma involves making our own bodies a safe place to live again. The power that comes from learning to self-soothe is often life changing.

  • Healing from complex relational trauma involves re-creating safety in relationships. The therapeutic relationship can be helpful in this way, as it offers safety, consistency, and clear boundaries. When we pick up on compassionate attunement, we can learn to generate these feelings on our own, directing compassion inwards.

Image by Bre Smith

My counseling approach is secular, trauma-informed, feminist, and culturally sensitive.

SECULAR MENTAL HEALTH COUNSELING IN SOUTH CAROLINA.

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